The Summons Lyrics

Song Credits:
Song – Will You Come And Follow Me
Album – The Worship Collection ( Vol-06)
Genre – Praise & Worship
Writers – Graham Maule, John L. Bell

The Summons Lyrics

Will you come and follow me
If I but call your name?
Will you go where you don’t know
And never be the same?
Will you let my love be shown,
Will you let my name be known,
Will you let my life be grown
In you and you in me?

Will you leave yourself behind
If I but call your name?
Will you care for cruel and kind
And never be the same?
Will you risk the hostile stare
Should your life attract or scare?
Will you let me answer prayer
In you and you in me?

Will you let the blinded see
If I but call your name?
Will you set the prisoners free
And never be the same?
Will you kiss the leper clean,
And do such as this unseen,
And admit to what I mean
In you and you in me?

Will you love the ‘you’ you hide
If I but call your name?
Will you quell the fear inside
And never be the same?
Will you use the faith you’ve found
To reshape the world around,
Through my sight and touch and sound
In you and you in me?

Lord, your summons echoes true
When you but call my name.
Let me turn and follow you
And never be the same.
In your company I’ll go
Where your love and footsteps show.
Thus I’ll move and live and grow
In you and you in me.

About The Summons Lyrics:

What are the right words for a specific psalm tune? This inquiry relies on numerous things, remembering the confidence custom for which you were raised, the specific setting or formality in which a psalm text is utilized, or the song tune you sang when you went to chapel with your grandma.

Take the song tune Hyfrydol for instance. The Methodists and Presbyterians sing “Come, thou since a long time ago anticipated Jesus” to this most loved tune, while the Baptists and a few Presbyterians sing “Love heavenly, all loves dominating” or “Commendation the Lord, ye sky venerate him.” The Mormons sing “In quietude, our Savior” while some different Christians sing “I will sing the wondrous story” and “Jesus, what a companion for miscreants.” All to a similar tune, Hyfrydol.

A few years prior, an exceptionally dear companion of mine, a college and theological school music teacher, went through a difficult stretch expertly. He invested some energy strolling the sea shores on the east bank of Florida, asking God for direction and subsequent stages.

He ended up one Sunday morning in an Episcopal help where they sang “There’s a vastness in God’s Mercy” to the contemporary tune St. Helena (our Hymn 469) by Calvin Hampton (1938-1984). This specific marriage of text and tune completely changed him and turned into his number one psalm.

Experiencing childhood in another custom that sang this content to the tune Beecher (our Hymn 470), a solid tune with a totally unique character, God addressed my companion through natural words and another tune.

I’m glad to say that we utilize both of these tunes and love them both for various reasons. Same content, various tunes.

This equivalent thought introduces itself this Sunday morning (February 25) at our 10:30 formality. Our 5:30 Celtic ritual uses the psalm tune Kelvingrove frequently, and we have nearly three different writings in our area collection for this tune. Kelvingrove is an animating, solid Celtic tune from the Iona custom to which we love to sing “Will you come and follow me.”

Arranger and creator John Bell named his song The Summons, which he composed after he was acknowledged into the local area in 1980. For his content, John chose this conventional Scottish song Kelvingrove, a commendable tune itself.

Be that as it may..

In 1989, John Hooker’s minister at St. Philip’s in the Hills in Tucson needed another experience for the area’s Maundy Thursday supper. The subject of the supper was an Upper Room insight, a calling of every individual by name for worker service similarly that Jesus enabled his pupils for service at that critical Thursday dinner before his Friday execution.

A minister and area artist at this point (Memphians will recollect John Hooker as organist/choirmaster of Calvary Episcopal Church downtown), John continued returning to The Summons as an ideal book for this Maundy Thursday supper, however the Kelvingrove tune just was not exactly right. Along these lines, he composed another tune and named it for his companion Mary Alexandra who had gotten back from a journey to the Isle and Community of Iona the year earlier.

Mary Alexandra is one of a kind and changing in the very that Calvin Hampton’s tune St. Helena is for “There’s a vastness.” As John has said to me, this content continues “to turn back onto itself again and again.” Indeed, John has caught this inside the rich, lavish Key of D-level Major. His delicately shaking backup is “through-created,” that is, ceaseless once you start.

With a concise presentation, short intervals and a tag toward the end, the piece is consistent and melodically turns around upon itself, mirroring the content, until its charitable close. Mary Alexandra adjusts to both the organ and piano, yet I discover it is particularly wonderful on the piano, which is the way we will sing this psalm on Sunday.

The Summons contains thirteen inquiries posed by Jesus in the primary individual. The initial four verses are in Jesus’ voice, while the fifth refrain is our reaction to Jesus. Refrain four will make the peruser and artist do an abstract turn around: “Will you love the ‘You’ you stow away in the event that I however call your name.” Read that state gradually a couple of times and consider.

I’m appreciative that my companion and associate John Hooker made another tune for this content. Divine motivation regularly emerges from need. I’m additionally pleased that, at Church of the Holy Communion, we sing the two tunes and utilize this song text in different ceremonial settings. Make certain to go to Hymn 757 in Wonder, Love, and Praise” on Sunday morning and appreciate singing John’s verse tune.

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Song Credits:
Song – Will You Come And Follow Me
Album – The Worship Collection ( Vol-06)
Genre – Praise & Worship
Writers – Graham Maule, John L. Bell
Publisher / Copyrights – Words: 1987 Wgrg, Iona Community, Glasgow, Scotland, G2 3dh
Key – F Major
Tags Calling, Sending, Sacrifice, Discipleship, Following, Obedience, Call Of God
Themes – Faith, Love
Scripture References – Matthew 19:21; Genesis 48:16; 2 Thessalonians 1:12; John 17:23; John 14:20; Job 39:11; Isaiah 10:3; Psalm 146:7;

The Summons Lyrics